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December/January Newsletter!

 

December 2020/January 2021

Welcome to the December/January issue of WonderWell, a newsletter intended to gather the most groundbreaking research and insightful commentaries in evidence-based medicine, wellness, healthcare leadership, writing, and innovation to help you live and work in alignment with your purpose and well-being.

*Please note that to access hyperlinks of articles, resources, and other tidbits referenced , please subscribe on the website.*

This month only, the hyperlink to the official newsletter may be found here (why April? no idea): https://mailchi.mp/781be024f030/wonderwell-april-9496693

"In Flight" -- Vancouver, BC, November 2020.

 

Some things that had me wondering this month:

1. COVID and...vaccines.
November was a big month in terms of vaccine development, with vaccines from
Pfizer and Moderna/BioGen -- both are similar in terms of efficacy (not to be confused with effectiveness -- primer on the difference re: trials here, and with vaccines here), but one is more 'stable' than the other in terms of logistics. Logistics is HUGE when it comes to vaccines, as the global health world has shown us for decades. If an adequate cold chain is not maintained, the vaccine is effectively ineffective. It will be an interesting 'race' to watch which gets picked, for where and whom.

As well, vaccine distribution -- in both Canada and the U.S. -- is a tricky topic. This piece in NBC news is interesting as it does get to the idea of distributive justice...without going all the way. It's a topic I've been thinking a lot about.

2. A podcast to listen to:
This episode from the #AmWriting podcast is excellent, as it covers themes that every journalist (and health professional) must grapple with: boundaries. Here, journalist Lauren Sandler discusses her book, in which she is an 'immersion journalist' covering a young homeless woman during her pregnancy and after her delivery, as a window into the issues homeless women in general (and pregnant homeless women specifically) face in America. I'll admit, I cringed at parts, because I personally don't think I would be able to embed myself in that way, and I've embraced the movement away from what's known as "poverty porn-- that said, kudos to Lauren for openly speaking about the challenges, the ethical aspects, and how she is reconciling it (part of it includes setting up a way to donate to the cause on her website here). She also makes a key point that made me rethink my position -- how are we meant to advance change or become aware of some struggles without having stories that capture our hearts (and minds)?

3.On...being misunderstood...and asking if you're ok?
This is probably the best essay I've read in months, and it's a little like a Rorschach test (I sent it to a few friends and we each took something different away). To me, it's about being on the spectrum and having experienced sexual abuse, but not wanting to make those aspects overshadow her identity. But the *way* the piece was written, without using terms that we feel tend to be loaded, makes it particularly interesting and perceptive. I've been thinking a LOT about how some of us need more information in order to understand another, whereas often this 'other' just needs acceptance (and understanding might come later). I've noticed it with one person in my life in particular, and it's been a tricky thing to navigate but an immense opportunity to learn.

And this, by Duchess Meghan Markle, is well-worth the read in that it's timely and applicable to all of us especially as these dark days of Winter approach. She's an admirable woman who successfully extricated herself out of a toxic situation where she wasn't able (or allowed) to thrive, but the point here goes well beyond her devastating experience with a miscarriage. It gets to why simply asking "are you ok" can make all the difference.

4.Sound (and wise) reflections
~From the BrainPickings newsletter -- more on William Blake, whom I wrote about in September. Fascinating artist/poet who wasn't appreciated until years after he died.

~Great reporting by Canadian healthcare journalist, Wendy Glauser, on the psychosocial aspects of the pandemic.

5.Miscellany
~An expose into McKinsey -- but specifically because I can't stop thinking about their hiring process, which I, and many others have personally experienced. It's case-based, but heavily math-based (i.e. long-hand division) and timed. Imagine if consulting companies looked at other aspects, e.g. ethics and integrity, and ability to solve problems or think in unique ways. Could the outcome here have been different? Could this crisis be the beginning of something really great for McKinsey in terms of how they approach solving tough problems, now that they're coming to terms with a big one of their own?

~The untimely and tragic death of Zappos CEO, Tony Hsieh hits close. Part of his personal story is featured in my own book, and his book (Delivering Happiness) is a must read for anyone interested in workplace culture and organizational psychology. Hsieh certainly left an influence on the world, that goes beyond tech and entrepreneurship -- placing customers first and looking at how to make workers thrive -- could do wonders if we applied those principles to healthcare. Above, I've linked the audiobook because it's Tony reading it himself, and I loved hearing his energy and excitement, but most importantly his commitment to those he worked with. He was a true example of "servant leadership."

6.Best tweet of the month goes to...
Holland Stanton, a medical trainee -- only because I've been personally obsessed with the idea of compatibility as it relates to the Match.
Can you do a story on The Match? & Med School education in America?

But I also REALLY loved this, as Charles is a new friend and his success is incredible to watch (and inspiring) -- his book Interior Chinatown will make you laugh (and cry) and is so deserving of a National Book Award. More info on his book here, and our interview here. And, related to this -- another from Jacob Weisberg, only because Penguin Random House is *my* publisher (so I very much am interested to know if the imprint might be, indeed, Simon's Random Penguin đŸ™‚ ).

Ok, and I REALLY loved this -- I had to mention something about the election, right!

 

In My Own Words...
This month, I'll share one last image -- that of my book manuscript, which, thankfully I'll be submitting on deadline. All 300 pages (100,000 words) of Draft 1 are here...in print. Keep in mind this is the first draft of what will likely be around 10 at the minimum. The marathon begins (or continues?). Can't wait for you to read it once it's ready.

 

Draft uno...

This past month was also interesting for another reason, in terms of a cool opportunity that cropped up to not report on a problem I've been noticing, but actually be part of the solution. And it deals with tech and healthcare. Stay tuned next month for more details...at least what I might be able to share, but it's really exciting... đŸ™‚

Can you believe we're at the end of the year that felt like a decade? 20/20 vision in optometry (and opthalmology) means "perfect" vision. For what it's worth, none of us had foresight that 2020 would be filled with a pandemic, massive social unrest (but for racial justice, which was a long time coming), and even more unusual political happenings (with a still 'contested' election in the U.S.). But we DO have the hindsight now -- of the many lessons this year has given us. With that in mind, we're entering 2021 with perhaps new priorities, restructured plans and goals, and perhaps a lot more hope.

Resilience, I've learned, is earned, not given.

Have a wondrous & well (and healthy, and safe!) Holiday season, in fact *make* it
especially so,

 

Amitha Kalaichandran, M.D., M.H.S.

Written by Amitha


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