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April Newsletter!

 

April 2021

Welcome to the April issue of WonderWell, a newsletter intended to gather the most groundbreaking research and insightful commentaries in evidence-based medicine, wellness, healthcare leadership, writing, and innovation to help you live and work in alignment with your purpose and well-being. 

**to access all hyperlinks, please subscribe**

Some things that had me wondering this month:

1. COVID and…
~Vaccine hesitancy.  In December I wrote about a hypothesis on scarcity and social proof about potentially overcoming vaccine hesitancy. Recently the WSJ published data on vaccine hesitancy, which appears to be going down on several states — could it be secondary to scarcity and social proof? And what *might* it mean for vaccine hesitancy in general?

~The politics behind pandemics. This, from the New Yorker is an excellent review of Baylor Medicine’s Dr. Peter Hoetz latest book, Preventing the Next Pandemic, and a great reflection on a remarkable career in infectious diseases/global health.

~Design. COVID has impacted the design world in unique way, in the New York Times .

2. Podcasts to listen to:
The On Being podcast is a favorite. Recently host Krista Tippett interviewed psychologist Christine Ryntab about how our mental health has been affected by the pandemic.  

Part 1 (covers mastery vs success) and Part 2 (covers a beautiful term called “aesthetic force”) where Brene Brown, for her Daring Leadership podast, interviews Harvard’s Dr Sarah Lewis. It might be the best set of interviews I’ve listened to in years. It will nourish you and inspire you (and i’m currently listening to Lewis’ gorgeous book The Rise, on audiobook). 

I’ve been listening to poet and musician Morgan Harper Nichols daily for the last 2 weeks. Her 3-12 min episodes are beautiful reflections which leave you with a question. Nichols’ voice alone is incredible, and her instagram account covers her artwork as well. She’s a rising star to watch. 
Some of my recent favorites have been on trusting despite the uncertainty, on our purpose (with lovely) a river analogy, and 7 phrases to help with future worries. 

3.On…forecasting and expertise
This is from the archives of the Atlantic, by the incredible David Epstein (his book Range is a must-read). Here, citing Philip Tetlock’s work, he calls into question ‘expertise’ — indeed it must be a balance. We need experts to guide us, but non-experts help us identify blind-spots. This is a topic I’ve been thinking about a LOT with the pandemic. I’m now left thinking it’s more of an ‘amplification problem.’  Perhaps, with COVID, given the amount of uncertainty and the fast-moving nature of science, the media tends to rely on experts to self-identify. This then leads to many ‘non-experts’ (confident but incompetent, at least as it relates to medicine and public health), who *should* be part of the discussion, but shouldn’t be amplified, get amplified the media.

Recently an economist at Brown received immense criticism (here, here , here, and here, but really — there were lots of important points made) for an article about childhood COVID transmission.  It was inaccurate and simply unwise, as many physicians and epidemiologists identified, but it likely wasn’t intentionally so. The simplest explanation: economists and epidemiologists look at data and value various factors *differently.* As an economist, her views could add to the discussion — it may just be that they should not have been amplified in that fashion, as it drowned out the current recommendations and expert forecasts. It was quickly debunked but the harm cannot be underestimated. Reporters, and others without expertise but who write about a subject, are expected to incorporate expertise into their pieces, in order to report out an issue fairly and accurately. It’s possible that this economist may have avoided the controversy by interviewing epidemiologists in a “reported op-ed” (one that isn’t solely her opinion), as opposed to writing an op-ed from her point of view as, effectively, a non-expert in public health. Perhaps an article on the economic impacts of COVID or how an economist may *think* through the challenge of lockdowns would have been more appropriate.

We must amplify experts who are truly able to comment on the pandemic and make recommendations, and not simply allow the loudest voices (in the room or on Twitter) to prevail. This, ultimately, causes harm to public understanding, and influences behavior in a way that ultimately negatively impacts how the pandemic is handled. Editors and producers, therefore, must also be equally discerning when commissioning op-eds from academics, and ensure their expertise lines up with the subject matter.

4.Sound (and wise) reflections
~A former incarcerated man reflects on solitary confinement — which he suffered through for 18 years — in NYTOpinion 
~The challenge of bullying in healthcare, in the Financial Post 
~The role of trauma in gun violence, in the NYTOpinion
~There were many great pieces about anti-asian violence. This Q+A in the New Yorker and this op-ed by National Book Award winner, Charles Yu, in the LATimes are worth a read

5.Miscellany 
~From the LATimes, the things migrants carried and dropped on their trek across the border for a better life
~The incomparable Dr Eric Topol, for the WSJ, on how science accelerated over the last 13 months
~The plight of child caregivers, in the LATimes
~In the NYT, the incredible life of one of my favorite writers as a child — Beverley Cleary
~One of the best personal essays I’ve read in months, in the Washington Post, about medical error, second opinions, and the limits of medical ‘expertise’ 

6.Best tweet of the month goes to…
A Three-WAY tie:

This thread is inspiring (it’s worth reading in its entirety). 

@JouLee:
We think strength is self-sufficiency— achievement without reliance on others. We think that if someone else gains, we lose. But intertwined, we all go further. This is the secret of Silicon Valley. Help others, ask for help, and collective strength multiplies.

@gradydoctor:
Reflecting on these statements from 2 good friends in academic medicine this week: 1. “There HAS to be a consequence between nothing and professional death.” 2. “Healing HAS to include restorative justice–which begins with accountability.” Yeah. That part.

In My Own Words…

This was a month with lots of writing, and the next few weeks will be dedicated to my book revisions (due in 3 wks!). For Medium‘s Coronavirus vertical, I wrote a primer about the AstraZeneca vaccine, clots, and concerns about causality. For Elemental, I examined the role of prayer in healing, inspired by the story of Molly (that many of us were inspired by in February). Last, for Wired I tackled an issue that has been on my mind for many weeks: the puzzle of pandemic prognostication (and why some see things through an optimistic lens, whereas others are more concerned) — I make mention of epistemic trust and the issue I discuss above (point #3).

Also, a personal one from the archive (2017), about my grandfather, who has been on my mind late, in Hektoen International.

My time in Vancouver is soon coming to an end (as, sadly, variants are taking hold). It has been such an incredible place, with so much natural beauty, to spend time in over the last 8 months.

 
Have a healthy, joyful, month,


Amitha Kalaichandran, M.D., M.H.S.

March newsletter!

March 2021
**To access all of the hyperlinks, please subscribe**

Welcome to the March issue of WonderWell, a newsletter intended to gather the most groundbreaking research and insightful commentaries in evidence-based medicine, wellness, healthcare leadership, writing, and innovation to help you live and work in alignment with your purpose and well-being

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Two days, Two seasons” (Kitsilano, Vancouver BC, February 14th vs February 13th, 2021)

 

 

 

 

Some things that had me wondering this month:

1. COVID and…
~A new vaccine. The Johnson & Johnson COVID vaccine is now available in the US (hopefully in Canada soon). How does it stack up against Moderna and Pfizer (and AstraZeneca)? This might be the wrong question when scarcity is at play: take what you get, as this NYT op-ed advises. Remember: the vaccine is intended to prevent severe disease, i.e. disease that would require a hospitalization/ICU visit or worse: death. It may not be perfectly effective at preventing infection. The flu vaccine is similar, though often has much lower effectiveness. But in general, those vaccinated with the flu vaccine are at a much lower risk of severe disease, even if they do have mild flu symptoms.

~Vaccine diplomacy. This will continue to be a topic to watch closely, and one I’ve been pondering since the Summer when I received a press release about an Indian manufacturer planning to ramp up production of a vaccine (which ended up being the Astra Zeneca vaccine). India specifically has played a major role over the last 15 years in terms of drug manufacturing: especially as it relates to anti-retroviral drugs, and facilitating a price drop which improved global access.  India has manufactured vaccines for global health (e.g. polio) as distributed by organizations like GAVI, WHO, UNICEF, etc. But this is the first time to my knowledge that India is playing a role in manufacturing vaccines for the ‘developed’ world.  So not only is Jamaica receiving shipments, but so is Canada.    The editors of the NYT Opinion section penned an excellent op-ed on the theme here. My question: will India then be able to leverage other interests (e.g. politically, trade/economic) with recipient countries? And what are the potential pitfalls and opportunities?   A handy comparison: the role China played in providing PPE to affected countries, and the potential downside regarding accountability as it relates to investigations into the virus origins in the country.

~On reopening schools. It remains a tricky debate. I like Dr Leana Wen’s take in the Washington Post.  Side note: I spent my 32nd birthday in Charleston, and Dr Wen happened to be there (story for another time, but she’s fabulous!)

Screening for health conditions. There’s no doubt that there are several externalities secondary to the pandemic. One big one that doesn’t get discussed enough: the negative impact on screening. This piece, in the NYT, tackles it head on.

~Children. A well presented and reported piece on the youngest victims of the pandemic in the Post — even if children rarely suffer from severe disease, they are impacted in other long-lasting ways.

~The best essay I’ve read (about COVID since the pandemic began), by none other than Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee. This one is about the mystery behind the low death rate in India in the New Yorker (followup with my favourite New Yorker piece period, from 2017, Cancer’s Invasion Equation, also by Dr. Mukherjee)

2. Podcasts to listen to:
This episode of Brene Brown’s podcast features one of my favorite thinkers, Adam Grant.
Here they interview each other in a sense, and Grant gets into the topic of his latest book, “Think Again,” while also sharing a variety of anecdotes about his career and life decisions.

And because she’s utterly delightful, Fran Lebowitz interviewed by Kara Swisher on Sway is well worth the laughs and incredulity, if only for her line comparing herself to Helen Keller.

3.On…systemic racism in the 1950s and 2021
~Harry Jerome is a Canadian that I, and many others, never learned about in school. As a Black man attending a mostly all-white school in Vancouver in the 1950s, he had rocks hurled at him. His story of that time is captured here, in the CBC.  A track star that went on to set several world records, Jerome sadly died in 1982. Now Vancouver is finding a way to honor him.

~This is an important read from StatNews‘ Theresa Gaffey, about a big story that was trending on Twitter earlier in February. A program director, who happened to be a Black woman, was dismissed from her position after flagging issues of systemic racism. This topic in general is a sad and very real issue in academic medicine, affecting residents, but also, clearly, staff as well.  Of note, Gaffey is a multimedia producer but I hope she stays on this beat (medical education) as this article was so well reported, covering the nuances particularly well.

~And for GQ, the incomparable Wesley Lowery on how one police department, in Ithaca, New York is attempting reform. It may be a model for others.

4.Sound (and wise) reflections
~From NYTMag, this profile of Kazuo Ishiguro is simply sublime. What a brilliant mind

~The type of love that makes you happiest, in the Atlantic

~From ESPN, on injury and resilience, through the story of basketball player Azzi Fudd

~One of the most harmful questions you can ask children, by Adam Grant for CNBC

5.Miscellany 
~From NYTOpinion about nurses, and what the pandemic means for the future of nursing. We rarely hear from other frontline workers (other than physicians), so this was illuminating for me. That said, someone on Twitter, who happens to be a nurse, flagged to me that that article was not inclusive, and my sharing of it failed to amplify this issue. And, well, I agree (I have my own blindspots). That opinion piece did not include the fact that in many cities most hard hit, nurses of color (mostly women) have disproportionately been affected. So I also share this article, in CNN: about the toll on Filipino nurses in particular, though the same may be said of Caribbean-American nurses, Latin-American nurses, and so forth. It also reminded me of why I mentor with the Op-Ed project, to help ensure that under-represented voices get heard.

~The tragic story of Joe Ligon, which broke my heart and I *still* can’t wrap my head around: to be captive for THAT many years, and now released. Unimaginable.

~The death of groundbreaking cancer researcher, Dr. Emil Freireich hits hard for anyone in pediatric medicine. He was a trailblazer to say the least, and highly disagreeable in his approach as a pediatric oncologist and researcher. He didn’t care much for the status quo: his focus was on finding a treatment for childhood leukemia, which he did.  His obituary in the NYT is a must read.

6.Best tweet of the month goes to…
A compelling speech by Ryan Leaf, about the NFL’s failure to acknowledge mental health issues. As I write this another former player, Louis Nix, has died (though the cause has not been confirmed).

I don’t know who needs to hear this, or if I just needed to say it, but I will not continue to stand by and watch my brothers disappear because the multi billion $$$ corporation won’t do the right thing.
@nfl @NFLPA do something!! #igoturback #nflbrotherhood

And a thread by the incredible writer and musician Morgan Harper Nichols, about her recent diagnosis of autism, as a reminder of how women are often diagnosed late, or misdiagnosed:

Last Saturday, after a very long journey, I was officially diagnosed with autism and I just want to share my experiences here for anyone else out there whom it could help (a lengthy thread)

In My Own Words…

My lockdown obsession: colorful heritage hen eggs by Black Rooster Farms, Langley BC
January 2021  (these aren’t painted by the way– the colors are REAL!)

 

This month, I had the pleasure of being interviewed by influencer Camille Styles, on finding our purpose. I also participated in the “SoMeDocs writers conference” which was really fun (some great questions).

Other than that, I’m knee deep in book edits, with revisions due in April, and polishing off a textbook chapter I’m co-writing with a friend and colleague, Dr. Daniel Lakoff (emergency medicine physician with NYP Hospitals).  I will have a piece out next week, which I’ll include in next month’s newsletter.

To end I’d like to highlight Andre Picard’s book on elder care arrived this week, and is timely and important. For my American readers: Picard is a must follow, as arguably the most prominent health journalist in Canada, and longstanding columnist for the Globe and Mail. He shares his commentary thoughtfully and wisely.

Have a healthy, joyful, month,


Amitha Kalaichandran, M.D., M.H.S.

February Newsletter!

February 2021
**To access hyperlinks, please subscribe**

Welcome to the February issue of WonderWell, a newsletter intended to gather the most groundbreaking research and insightful commentaries in evidence-based medicine, wellness, healthcare leadership, writing, and innovation to help you live and work in alignment with your purpose and well-being.

“Thin Places.” Wreck Beach, Vancouver BC, credit: Amitha Kalaichandran.

This is jam-packed with many things that had me wondering this month:

1. COVID and…
~Vaccine distribution. Logistics remains a big issue. Now we’re looking at optimizing vials and syringes. I enjoyed this piece in the NYT, which suggests ramping up the speed of vaccination, and focusing on priority groups

~How the most marginalized will almost always bear the larger brunt of the burden when it comes to most health concerns, in this case a global pandemic. This is a very sad story about a teen, who happened to be a Syrian refugee, who died from COVID after likely being exposed during his work in a longterm care home.

~A beautiful brief reflection (part of a newsletter) on how a journalist treked across the U.S. to ensure his mother got the vaccine roadtrip

~The WashPo published this, a deep reflection with Dr. Stanley Plotkin, who happens to be a LEGEND in public health and vaccinology — his name appeared most frequently (to my recollection) during our vaccinology modules at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

~February is Black History Month, and a colleague and friend Dr. Uche Blackstock, along with her twin sister, described the inequities around vaccine rates, also in the WashPo.

~Jay Caspian Kang on why San Francisco may have been better equipped and prepared than other cities, in the New Yorker.

2. Podcast to listen to:
This episode from the Tara Brach podcast is excellent. I read Brach’s book “Radical Acceptance” last year, and just finished “Radical Compassion” which is even better.

As well, Kara Swisher has been hitting it out of the park lately, on Sway. Her episode with a Parler cofounder was slightly shocking (in an illuminating way) but her interview with Isabel Wilkerson was particularly excellent.

3.On…how to disagree better
This is a topic I’ve been thinking about for years and its more crucial during these divisive ties. In 2017 I wrote about the topic for the Walrus. Now the great Adam Grant has a new book out call Think Again (link to purchase here). His article in the New York Times serves as a wonderful appetizer. Another book to add to the list, on this topic, is Buster Benson’s Why are We Yelling? which was the best book I read in 2020.

4.Sound (and wise) reflections
~From the New Yorker, an interview between Isaac Chotiner and two experts from Turkey about how developing countries are navigating access to the COVID vaccine, and how more economically stable countries should lift their weight. I always enjoy Isaac’s interviews because he doesn’t hold back, and asks the questions most of us *want* to ask but might not.

~In the New Yorker again, a deeply vulnerable piece about opioid addiction and its toll on young people and families, from the journalist, Masha Gessen, herself.

~In the Atlantic, how your well-being is linked to where you choose to live — Arthur Brooks’ columns have been insightful and deeply relevant for these times

5.Miscellany
~For Black history month, this article on the experience of a black female interventional cardiologist, published by Canada’s CTV news is a must-read, especially as it gets to the ‘double burden’ of being a person of color and a woman in medicine, and the systemic challenges (e.g. microaggressions) she and many others have faced. Couple this with an excellent editorial in the CMAJ about why anti-racism should be a professional competence.

~The link between workplace culture and well-being is crucial to understand, and it’s a link I’m particularly interested in (if we can improve culture we will make major leaps as it relates to thriving — we spend most of our time at work!). This article, in the CBC was a powerful investigative piece into how this issue played out in one of Canada’s most important institutions — and underscored that women in power can *also* perpetuate harassment and abuse, a point that is too often ignored or overlooked. Undoubtedly, while Pyette has now resigned, she has done so only after leaving a trail of likely traumatized victims — in government, policing (those tasked to protect her were also allegedly abused), and employees at the Montreal Science Centre among others — behind, victims who may never see real justice. This piece, which is part of a series by CBC, also speaks to the power of journalism to push for accountability, specifically as it relates to workplace culture.

~Michael Lewis is one of the best storytellers of our time. There will be many “pandemic” books published in the coming year(s) but if I were to bet, his might be the best one, and this article about his track record of bringing us gripping stories is excellent.

~The result of the Capitol Hill riots in early January will bear out for years. We are seeing the ripple effects now. The suicide of a police officer days later for instance, and AOC recently shared the impact on her as well. Collective trauma is an under-discussed issue, as a recent tweet clearly illustrated to me recently.

~A year ago on January 26 2020 Kobe Bryant, his daughter Gigi, and six others died in a helicopter crash. Last week this article, by Mirin Fader, in The Ringer elucidates his legacy.

~Are you easily frustrated during the pandemic? Well this short video (as with most of his short videos) by Daniel Pink might provide some tips.

6.Best tweet of the month goes to…
A three-way tie!

A mother and lawyer who asked for prayers for her daughter Molly over Twitter:

Please. Please. Please. Everyone PRAY for my daughter Molly. She has been in an accident and suffered a brain trauma. She’s unconscious in ICU. Please RT and PRAY 🙏

Collective prayer, known as intercessory prayer has been studied extensively (the evidence isn’t great, as expected), but it was unique to see social media being used for this purpose. Would Molly have been ok otherwise? Possibly. But it was a nice moment to see a tweet like this go viral. I’m staying tuned on her progress and hope she has a swift recovery.

This tweet {hyperlinked} and {hyperlinked} encapsulate a big challenge for many writers: navigating community and the experience of envy and competition. These went viral for a reason! What I know for sure is that we live in an abundant world, and one person’s success doesn’t preclude your own. I’m grateful for the community of writers I hold dear, who inspire and motivate me.

And another, by Adam Grant, on curiosity:
The hallmark of curiosity is a thirst for knowledge that has no obvious utility. Being a lifelong learner is taking joy in exploration regardless of whether the discovery has immediate relevance. The goal is to understand for the sake of understanding.

In My Own Words…
This month, I had the pleasure of interviewing two companies for my blog on the intersection between tech and well-being. Joy Ventures invests and incubates primarily in tech companies that are committed to health and wellbeing. LongWalks is an app that connects people around a common daily prompt, while encouraging guided reflections which can then be shared with the community (or kept private).

As well, as part of my work as a mentor-editor with the OpEdProject, I edited this excellent article by a palliative care physician from Columbia University and the director of the Center for Bioethics and Health Law at the University of Pittsburgh, for the Hastings Center on vaccine distribution

I can also finally share that in December I was approached by Twitter to consult on a really interesting initiative to improve the health of the platform. We’ve seen so much strife happen on social media, but these platforms, if designed a bit differently, can also be a tool we can use to connect and empathize, perhaps more so during a pandemic. It’s an honour to be part of these efforts.

Have a healthy, joyful, month,

Amitha Kalaichandran, M.D., M.H.S.

November Newsletter!

November Newsletter!

November 2020

Welcome to the November issue of WonderWell, a newsletter intended to gather the most groundbreaking research and insightful commentaries in evidence-based medicine, wellness, healthcare leadership, writing, and innovation to help you live and work in alignment with your purpose and well-being.
***Please note that to access hyperlinks please subscribe**

CREDIT: Olivia Van Dyke

CREDIT: Olivia Van Dyke/Tofino British Columbia/ October 2020

Some things that had me wondering this month:

1. COVID and…hidden patterns
Some rapid-fire wonderings:
~Published in the BMJ: a new hypothesis on face masks might be associated in falls in the elderly (and note, it’s well known that a hip fracture in an older person is significantly associated with mortality risk during the following year). There’s no doubt face masks are crucial, but how do we avoid the externalities such as falls?
~From the NYT: how schools that are open to in-person instruction are shifting via allowing teaching to occur outdoors. Related to this: Richard Louv’s classic book “Last Child in the Woods,” is an excellent foray into the issue of ‘nature deprivation’ — outdoor teaching helps lower COVID transmission risk while also changing the setting for learning (it would be interesting to know if this helps with attention)
~A great, short discussion of Dr Akiko Iwasaki’s work and recent award, in Science. There are many unsung heroes, namely researchers and physician leaders, who are finally being recognized for their work this year, during COVID. There is also a Canadian/UofToronto connection here, as she did some of her training at the University of Toronto. That aside, especially as a woman of colour in research/medicine, it’s wonderful to see her gain influence.
~Few more choice pieces from the NYT: by the great Carl Zimmer on vaccine safety as it relates to research trials, Ashley Fetters (whose articles in the Atlantic were among the best in my view) on loneliness as it relates to working from home, and this great one on COVID long-haulers in pediatrics.

2. Two incredible podcast episodes to listen to:
Tim Ferris with Seth Godin: a long-time listener to Tim’s podcast, in 2020 his empathy and curiosity with his interview subjects is even more clear. He asks the questions most interviewers don’t, and really gets into the nuts and bolts of “process” and “habits”. This interview with Godin is excellent because 90% of the time they cover the writing process and what Godin advises. Godin’s thoughts on writers block alone are golden.

The GOOP podcast with Rebecca Traister: a somewhat divisive journalist, Traister isn’t afraid to ask tough questions and here she really interrogates traditional ideas of feminism, and specifically the role that white women have taken in oppressing women of colour as well as men of colour. We all intersect with various identities and it is sometimes the case where learning into power “over” an oppressed group is confused with self-empowerment. On my wish-list for 2021 is for Traister to have her own podcast: I’d really just love to hear more of her takes on provocative issues, and she seems like she’d be a thoughtful but brave interviewer.

3.Tiny piece on friendship and connection
Maria Popova’s hugely popular newsletter is hands down my favourite weekly email. This one is from last year, but it rings true during this time as well.

4.Sound (and wise) reflections
~From Knowable magazine — what lies ahead for “Black Lives Matter” from a political scientist and sociologist.

~Water on the moon!! But even better — a millennial discovered it, from the New Yorker
“‘For the first nine hours and forty minutes,Casey Honniball, a 27 yr old planetary scientist, didn’t have much to do. She took a nap, ate a PBJ sandwich, & used her laptop to work on research proposals.”

So what was that about millennials being lazy and entitled again? 🙂

~And an obituary from a very interesting psychologist– one who questioned the status quo, and the elements of psychiatry & psychology that have become, rightly or wrongly, dogma. The squeaky wheels in medicine/psychology are the ones that often make these fields better.

5.Miscellany (politics edition)
~AOC in Vanity Fair: her journey, and earnestness, has been incredible to watch

~Racial politics and Kamala Harris, in the New Yorker: how does a possible future Vice President navigate the harmful stereotypes on anger?

~Why this year really does feel different, from Politico.

6.Best tweet of the month goes to…
ANOTHER TIE between

Posthumous Richard Feynman:
One of the signs of intelligence is to be able to accept the facts without being offended.

and editor Jenee Desmond-Harris, mostly because I couldn’t agree more:
The beach really fixes everything. Except home pandemic haircuts.

In My Own Words…
This month, I’ll share an archival piece about Halloween (one of the first pieces I ever published) and trends related to allergy — the Toronto Sun is Toronto’s answer to the NYPost (!); I’m just glad they liked it enough to publish it. And another archival one on election stress, and how it can affect voter turnout, published in Ozy, also from 2016. The month was busy writing wise but because I was invited to contribute a textbook chapter, for a textbook on physician well-being, to be released in late 2021. I’m fortunate to work on it with two mentors I greatly respect and enjoy working with, and the chapter focuses on physician mental health. Academic writing is much much different compared to say magazine or news or op-ed writing (obviously) but it was still fun. I’ve excerpted the last paragraph of our [draft] introduction here [for subscribers only]

This is a BIG week ahead for my American readers (but really, who are we kidding — it matters for all of us). If you can vote, please do. I know I’ll be feeling a bit anxious for the results.

Have a wondrous & well (and healthy, and safe!) month,

Amitha Kalaichandran, M.D., M.H.S.

August Newsletter!

August 2020

Welcome to the August issue of WonderWell, a newsletter intended to gather the most groundbreaking research and insightful commentaries in evidence-based medicine, wellness, healthcare leadership, writing, and innovation to help you live and work in alignment with your purpose and well-being.

So…it’s been awhile! I took a few months off to focus on the first deadline for my book…yes book! Details at the end. Oh, and I broke my wrist (ironic, given the title of my book). Let’s say that the experience was eye-opening, as I had a first-hand glimpse into the American healthcare system! I also left beautiful New York City, a place that I got to know well, & fell deeply in love with, in sickness and in health. As mentioned in my last newsletter, we are living in very strange times currently, so the newsletter has pivoted slightly to include the same themes, but with a COVID19 lens.

Some things that had me wondering this month:

1. Can pandemic boredom be…Good?
Perhaps. At least according to a piece in the New Yorker and another in the New York Times Opinion Section. Perhaps some of our anxieties involve having to sit in deep contemplation — whether we like it or not. But what possibilities might this afford us? I loved this quote from the NYT Op-ed:

“This suggests that self-reflection can be intrinsically aversive…Sure, boredom is a signal that we’re underaroused, but if we sit long enough with our uncomfortable thoughts and feelings, boredom could provide us with an opportunity to rethink whether we are spending our lives in a way that is rewarding and meaningful to us. What things might we change to make life — and ourselves — more interesting?”

2.Election things and Current events
A big month in the U.S., as Kamala Harris was chosen as the Vice Presidential candidate, marking the first time a South Asian American and Black American was chosen for the role. This is a great article on what it means for many women who identify with parts of her heritage — myself included!

We also marked the passing of actor Chadwick Boseman from colon cancer, at the age of 43. This is a form of cancer that has seen an uptick among young (20s-50) people, and it’s a disturbing trend that serves as a reminder to take the signs and symptoms seriously, and to get screened. It’s also a reminder that we never really know what strangers, and sometimes even our loved ones, are facing privately — so kindness is key. There were lots of tributes over the weekend: this one from the New Yorker is especially good, as is this essay by Marvel director Ryan Coogler. What’s clear is that Boseman was motivated to use his platform and his work to advance social change, particularly as it applies to racial justice. His work speaks for itself, and he left a legacy — both in his work and all of those he impacted (the consistent theme is his humility, grace, and kindness) — which may inspire us all. This quote below, from the New Yorker article, sticks out as it reflects how often the industries we find ourselves in reward the conformists over the trailblazer. Personally, I’d much rather blaze a trail.

It is, perhaps, this very sense of history, of responsibility, of implicit but intensely personal political commitment, that also inhibited the acclaim, while Boseman lived and worked, from his timid and stumbling Hollywood milieu.

3.Are Doctors People?
I dug deep into the archive for this one, reflecting on burnout and the struggles many doctors are facing during his pandemic. Roger I Lee was an incredibly accomplished physician leader who also served in WWI. He also had a little mischief and sarcastic streak, which makes him even more interesting. This short essay is worth the read. His books are hard to find as they’re out of print — this one is next on my list, and sitting patiently on my nightstand.

4.Our memories and our attachments and….a contrariwise state
The theme of “attachments” has preoccupied me since January, for many reasons. I just gave a talk framing this idea within the context of the Biblical Book of Job, and William Blake’s rendering of it. This season finale episode of Malcolm Gladwell’s podcast, Revisionist History, builds on this theme in a slightly different way, and it will move you to tears. It’s well worth a listen, especially as we mourn many loved ones this year. After you listen, read this, from the Globe and Mail — a beautiful reflection on how we might mourn our old [pre-COVID] lives.

Sometimes the biggest attachments we have are to our opinions — so the challenge then becomes understanding how these opinions form (the best understanding I have is that it’s a confluence of information and our values), and what it might take to change our minds. I’m in the process of changing my mind about something quite significant (I’d share but am still cocooning it), and so this essay, on Medium, which touches on Heraclitus and Jung and the idea of “contrariwise” — that eventually we gravitate towards our opposite mind-state, is fascinating.

5.A book I’ve been enjoying
On my pandemic wish-list, since around March, was that someone, somewhere, might write an anthology — short stories and essays and images — about this ‘time of COVID.’ A written and visual “time capsule” of this moment, in other words. Well, Bill Hayes has done just that with “How We Live Now,” just released this month. Hayes is an amazing writer, whose subjects generally focus on medical nonfiction (everything from an exploration into the man behind “Gray’s Anatomy” i.e. the textbook not the show! And his own struggle with insomnia). He is also the partner of the late, great, Oliver Sacks (and this lovely piece describes their love story). I’ve been enjoying his latest book as a way to integrate my own reflections of this time, some of which will make their way into the last chapter of my own book. It’s worth the read.

6.Best tweet of the month goes to...
Adam Grant — with his tweet on which opinions we decide to share. It might especially be relevant for forums like Twitter.

“Not every opinion needs to be voiced. Not every emotion needs to be expressed. A key question: does what you’re about to share align with your values? It’s good to be true to your thoughts and feelings in the moment. It’s better to be true to your guiding principles in life.”

In My Own Words…
This month I gave a talk to the National Partnership for Hospice Innovation, on grief and attachments during COVID. I’ll link to the video next month. I also moderated an important discussion for Ellevate, on mental health, with a focus on this challenging period. Last, I’m pleased to share my formal book announcement — it’s slated for publication in 2022. Thank you for joining me on this journey!

Have a wondrous & well (and healthy, and safe!) month,

Amitha Kalaichandran, M.D., M.H.S.