Read the Latest from the Blog!

Yes Please!

Welcome to the Blog

May newsletter!

May 2021

Welcome to the May issue of WonderWell, a newsletter intended to gather the most groundbreaking research and insightful commentaries in evidence-based medicine, wellness, healthcare leadership, writing, and innovation to help you live and work in alignment with your purpose and well-being. 

Some things that had me wondering this month:

1. COVID and…
India:  The situation in India is devastating, to say the least. I’ve written about the role of large companies in helping us address the pandemic in North America (I wrote about some ideas in Fast Company last March, and for Medium). After an initial block on raw materials, the US lifted the ban, which was wonderful news. Companies like Salesforce and Apple have also stepped up to help, and the diaspora has spoken out as well (Toronto Star)

Brazil: The plight of COVID children was meticulously described in NBC News — what might explain this pattern in Brazil, but not North America?  And, in the Globe and Mail, the tragic story of Emily Victoria Viegas, a 13 year old who died In Brampton Ontario

Vaccine Hesitancy: Some ideas on how to re-think it, in the New York Times. Two years ago I tackled the challenge more generally in the LATimes — it’s not about knowledge as much as it’s about understanding, the influence of our peers/social network, and our personal experiences intersecting with our values.

The Color Line: I’ve been waiting for someone to take a deep dive into the disproportionate element of race during this pandemic. Ibram Kendi did just that, in The Atlantic, and it’s worth a read.

To Mask or Not to Mask (and risks):  Nikole Hannah Jones’ Tweet suggests that masking may be a social good in more ways than one. For the Globe and Mail, Andre Picard places the salience of risk assessment, as it relates to the vaccines, in perspective.

Organized Chaos: In Canada, a big batch of vaccines from Johnson and Johnson was held back for inspection (note they arrived from the same US factory that was problematic), the National Advisory Council on Immunizations provided mixed messaging regarding two tiers of vaccines, meanwhile the US is looking to expand vaccine eligibility for the Pfizer vaccine to 12-15 year olds (though herd immunity is looking more unlikely).  That said, the W.H.O. had *finally* deemed COVID airborne (GREAT news) just weeks after an urgent an op-ed by the head of the W.H.O. that was timely and important.

2. Podcasts to listen to:
On her Dare to Lead Podcast, Brene Brown’s interview with Michael Bungay Stanier was brilliant. One big take-home (and there were many) was how to handle requests for giving advice, in a way that places the onus on the asker. It made me think a *lot* about  motivational interviewing: the aim being to help clarify the person’s goals, and reminding them of their own agency. Another interview, on the same podcast, with Angela Duckworth was also a worthwhile listen, especially near the end, when both Brown and Duckworth share experiences with envy and how best to channel that sentiment productively.

This Tim Ferris podcast episode, with Balaji Srinivasan, was from the end of March, but I listened to it in early April (late to the party). It’s well worth the 3.5 hour listen (in chunks!). Some highlights: how autonomy can help offset cancel culture, the future of cryptocurrency, and what work/purpose may eventually look like for each of us. I also appreciated Srinivasan’s orientation towards legacy building, and ‘giving back’ after his success.  

While not a podcast, an incredible Audiobook to make time for is: What Happened to You, by Oprah and Bruce Perry (a psychiatrist) which takes a deep dive into trauma. Over the last year I’ve realized how much is secondary to trauma — how we respond to things and how others respond for instance. These traumatic events, as Gabor Mate shared during a chat earlier this year, can seem minor at the time but they all lead to patterns that underlie how we understand the world and how we interact with others and respond to others. It has deepened my understanding of others and myself. The book wraps up with Oprah doubling down on post-traumatic ‘wisdom’ with some words around making ‘trauma your power.’  

3.On…re-examining medical culture (from 2017)
In the American Academy of Family Physicians — a nice framework for shifting medical culture, both as a leader and someone who is being ‘led.’ 

4.Sound (and wise) reflections
~On languishing, by Adam Grant in the NYT (who humbly shared a counterpoint by Austin Kleon)
~Newark police reform seems to have worked, in NJ.com. 
~Why the dental ‘system’ is so broken, in Canada at least, via The Walrus. It’s a great title too.

5.Miscellany 
~From STATNews: while diversity and inclusion efforts have expanded in most industries, medical education/medical schools is not one. And, in Time, how medical journals remain resistant to writing about systemic racism
~Cancel culture x Shame, by Ezra Klein in the NYT. I’d love to see/hear Brene Brown’s take on this topic.
~The history of the Rubik’s cube — I’ll have more to share in due time (it’s briefly in my book)! 

6.Best tweets of the month goes to…

Via Tim Ferris:
“Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

By @ProductHunt — your brain on Zoom (without breaks)

A lovely cartoon by one of my favorite children’s book illustrators, Debbie Ridpath Ohi on ignoring writing competition, and focusing on your own journey and pace

Viral viral thread on imaginary New Yorker covers — this one made me cry (a perfect depiction of grief).

And by @JamaalBowmanNY
Addiction requires love — not jail.

And last: @EzraKlein, on anxiety

And then came the pandemic. Reality was objectively terrifying, and many of us were trapped inside, severed from social connection and routine, with acres of time to fret. It was a bad mix. I know a lot of people who didn’t have an anxiety problem before, but do now.


In My Own Words…

For the last year, I’ve been perplexed by the role of medical expert witnesses in the criminal justice system. I didn’t have a reason to explore it until the Chauvin/George Floyd trial, and came across an excellent law review paper by David Faigman (Chancellor of UC Hastings School of Law) which got me thinking. It was truly a page turner!! 
I shared my thoughts in an opinion/analysis piece for Scientific American here.

This was a month with lots of *editing* of my first book draft; I completed the second draft in early May. One of the best books I’ve read over the last few months was by Ashley Bristowe, My Own Blood, which explores how, as a mother of a child with a rare health condition, she was able to navigate both the medical world and the personal world. I highly recommend it — we rarely get insight into these struggles from the ‘patient’ side of things.

It’s promising to see that in some places–parts of the US, things are opening up and vaccine rates are high. Canada still has issues with the vaccine supply, and places like India do as well. I had COVID last year and tested positive for antibodies before receiving the first dose of Pfizer — surprisingly I didn’t become ill but will have to see what the second shot will show. I’m feeling more optimistic than I have in over a year that things will start to open up in the Fall in most places in North America. Hopefully the whole world will be in a position to see the end of this terrible pandemic very soon as well — there’s no ‘them,’ just us, and if there was ever a time for vaccine diplomacy and general regard for global health, this is it.

Have a healthy, joyful, and safe month,


Amitha Kalaichandran, M.D., M.H.S.

Written by Amitha


Website: