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February Newsletter!

February 2021
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Welcome to the February issue of WonderWell, a newsletter intended to gather the most groundbreaking research and insightful commentaries in evidence-based medicine, wellness, healthcare leadership, writing, and innovation to help you live and work in alignment with your purpose and well-being.

“Thin Places.” Wreck Beach, Vancouver BC, credit: Amitha Kalaichandran.

This is jam-packed with many things that had me wondering this month:

1. COVID and…
~Vaccine distribution. Logistics remains a big issue. Now we’re looking at optimizing vials and syringes. I enjoyed this piece in the NYT, which suggests ramping up the speed of vaccination, and focusing on priority groups

~How the most marginalized will almost always bear the larger brunt of the burden when it comes to most health concerns, in this case a global pandemic. This is a very sad story about a teen, who happened to be a Syrian refugee, who died from COVID after likely being exposed during his work in a longterm care home.

~A beautiful brief reflection (part of a newsletter) on how a journalist treked across the U.S. to ensure his mother got the vaccine roadtrip

~The WashPo published this, a deep reflection with Dr. Stanley Plotkin, who happens to be a LEGEND in public health and vaccinology — his name appeared most frequently (to my recollection) during our vaccinology modules at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

~February is Black History Month, and a colleague and friend Dr. Uche Blackstock, along with her twin sister, described the inequities around vaccine rates, also in the WashPo.

~Jay Caspian Kang on why San Francisco may have been better equipped and prepared than other cities, in the New Yorker.

2. Podcast to listen to:
This episode from the Tara Brach podcast is excellent. I read Brach’s book “Radical Acceptance” last year, and just finished “Radical Compassion” which is even better.

As well, Kara Swisher has been hitting it out of the park lately, on Sway. Her episode with a Parler cofounder was slightly shocking (in an illuminating way) but her interview with Isabel Wilkerson was particularly excellent.

3.On…how to disagree better
This is a topic I’ve been thinking about for years and its more crucial during these divisive ties. In 2017 I wrote about the topic for the Walrus. Now the great Adam Grant has a new book out call Think Again (link to purchase here). His article in the New York Times serves as a wonderful appetizer. Another book to add to the list, on this topic, is Buster Benson’s Why are We Yelling? which was the best book I read in 2020.

4.Sound (and wise) reflections
~From the New Yorker, an interview between Isaac Chotiner and two experts from Turkey about how developing countries are navigating access to the COVID vaccine, and how more economically stable countries should lift their weight. I always enjoy Isaac’s interviews because he doesn’t hold back, and asks the questions most of us *want* to ask but might not.

~In the New Yorker again, a deeply vulnerable piece about opioid addiction and its toll on young people and families, from the journalist, Masha Gessen, herself.

~In the Atlantic, how your well-being is linked to where you choose to live — Arthur Brooks’ columns have been insightful and deeply relevant for these times

5.Miscellany
~For Black history month, this article on the experience of a black female interventional cardiologist, published by Canada’s CTV news is a must-read, especially as it gets to the ‘double burden’ of being a person of color and a woman in medicine, and the systemic challenges (e.g. microaggressions) she and many others have faced. Couple this with an excellent editorial in the CMAJ about why anti-racism should be a professional competence.

~The link between workplace culture and well-being is crucial to understand, and it’s a link I’m particularly interested in (if we can improve culture we will make major leaps as it relates to thriving — we spend most of our time at work!). This article, in the CBC was a powerful investigative piece into how this issue played out in one of Canada’s most important institutions — and underscored that women in power can *also* perpetuate harassment and abuse, a point that is too often ignored or overlooked. Undoubtedly, while Pyette has now resigned, she has done so only after leaving a trail of likely traumatized victims — in government, policing (those tasked to protect her were also allegedly abused), and employees at the Montreal Science Centre among others — behind, victims who may never see real justice. This piece, which is part of a series by CBC, also speaks to the power of journalism to push for accountability, specifically as it relates to workplace culture.

~Michael Lewis is one of the best storytellers of our time. There will be many “pandemic” books published in the coming year(s) but if I were to bet, his might be the best one, and this article about his track record of bringing us gripping stories is excellent.

~The result of the Capitol Hill riots in early January will bear out for years. We are seeing the ripple effects now. The suicide of a police officer days later for instance, and AOC recently shared the impact on her as well. Collective trauma is an under-discussed issue, as a recent tweet clearly illustrated to me recently.

~A year ago on January 26 2020 Kobe Bryant, his daughter Gigi, and six others died in a helicopter crash. Last week this article, by Mirin Fader, in The Ringer elucidates his legacy.

~Are you easily frustrated during the pandemic? Well this short video (as with most of his short videos) by Daniel Pink might provide some tips.

6.Best tweet of the month goes to…
A three-way tie!

A mother and lawyer who asked for prayers for her daughter Molly over Twitter:

Please. Please. Please. Everyone PRAY for my daughter Molly. She has been in an accident and suffered a brain trauma. She’s unconscious in ICU. Please RT and PRAY 🙏

Collective prayer, known as intercessory prayer has been studied extensively (the evidence isn’t great, as expected), but it was unique to see social media being used for this purpose. Would Molly have been ok otherwise? Possibly. But it was a nice moment to see a tweet like this go viral. I’m staying tuned on her progress and hope she has a swift recovery.

This tweet {hyperlinked} and {hyperlinked} encapsulate a big challenge for many writers: navigating community and the experience of envy and competition. These went viral for a reason! What I know for sure is that we live in an abundant world, and one person’s success doesn’t preclude your own. I’m grateful for the community of writers I hold dear, who inspire and motivate me.

And another, by Adam Grant, on curiosity:
The hallmark of curiosity is a thirst for knowledge that has no obvious utility. Being a lifelong learner is taking joy in exploration regardless of whether the discovery has immediate relevance. The goal is to understand for the sake of understanding.

In My Own Words…
This month, I had the pleasure of interviewing two companies for my blog on the intersection between tech and well-being. Joy Ventures invests and incubates primarily in tech companies that are committed to health and wellbeing. LongWalks is an app that connects people around a common daily prompt, while encouraging guided reflections which can then be shared with the community (or kept private).

As well, as part of my work as a mentor-editor with the OpEdProject, I edited this excellent article by a palliative care physician from Columbia University and the director of the Center for Bioethics and Health Law at the University of Pittsburgh, for the Hastings Center on vaccine distribution

I can also finally share that in December I was approached by Twitter to consult on a really interesting initiative to improve the health of the platform. We’ve seen so much strife happen on social media, but these platforms, if designed a bit differently, can also be a tool we can use to connect and empathize, perhaps more so during a pandemic. It’s an honour to be part of these efforts.

Have a healthy, joyful, month,

Amitha Kalaichandran, M.D., M.H.S.

Written by Amitha


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